Fatal Frost - James Henry I was a huge fan of Wingfield's Frost series. They had mystery and humor and excellent writing, so it was with great trepidation that I tried James Henry's re-creation of Frost. I was happy to see he has succeeded. It must be a very difficult thing to do and is not often well accomplished. Robert Goldsborough occasionally succeeds in recreating Archie and Nero, but no one has managed to authentically reproduce Fleming or Ludlum, and they weren't that good in the first place.

Henry's Frost has just the right combination of humor and mystery. It's 1982, Frost is a DS, and Denton is getting its first black policeman. Mullet happens to be on the golf course (a source of both embarrassment and amusement to the regulars) when the eviscerated body of a young boy is found. Overworked with a spate of local burglaries, Frost finds to the murder a welcome distraction and then the boy's sister disappears. Soon he begins to wonder if this isn't a reprise of a school-girls' wiccan adventure from years previous.

Listened to as an audiobook. Delightfully read by Stephen Thorne. Another one of those books that encourages mowing the lawn twice.